Accubita: Difference between revisions

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'''Accubita''' was the name of [[couch|couches]] which were used in the time of the [[Roman Empire|Roman emperors]], instead of the ''triclinium'', for reclining upon at meals. The mattresses and feather-beds were softer and higher, and the supports (''fulcra'') were lower in proportion, than in the ''triclinium''. The clothes and pillows spread over them were called ''accubitalia'' (''Historia Augusta'', Antoninus Heliogabalus, 19, 25).
An '''''accubitum''''' (also '''''sigma''''' or '''''stibadium''''') was a crescent-shaped [[couch]] used in the later [[Roman Republic]], replacing the earlier ''[[triclinium]]'' for reclining upon at meals.
 
The mattresses and feather-beds were softer and higher, and the supports (''fulcra'') were lower in proportion, than in the ''triclinium''. The clothes and pillows spread over them were called ''accubitalia'' (''Historia Augusta'', Antoninus Heliogabalus, 19, 25). Usually designed to accommodate five people, ''accubita'' continued to be used into the [[Middle Ages]]. 


==Sources==
==Sources==
* [http://penelope.uchicago.edu/Thayer/E/Roman/Texts/secondary/SMIGRA*/A.html Smith, W. (1878). ''A dictionary of Greek and Roman antiquities''. London: J. Murray], a work that is now in the public domain.  
* [http://penelope.uchicago.edu/Thayer/E/Roman/Texts/secondary/SMIGRA*/A.html Smith, W. (1878). ''A dictionary of Greek and Roman antiquities''. London: J. Murray], a work that is now in the public domain.  
*[http://phrontistery.info/a.html The Phrontistery]
*[http://www.1911encyclopedia.org/Triclinium "Triclinium"] — 1911 ''Encyclopædia Britannica''


[[Category:Classics Workgroup]]
[[Category:Classics Workgroup]]

Revision as of 15:01, 3 April 2007

An accubitum (also sigma or stibadium) was a crescent-shaped couch used in the later Roman Republic, replacing the earlier triclinium for reclining upon at meals.

The mattresses and feather-beds were softer and higher, and the supports (fulcra) were lower in proportion, than in the triclinium. The clothes and pillows spread over them were called accubitalia (Historia Augusta, Antoninus Heliogabalus, 19, 25). Usually designed to accommodate five people, accubita continued to be used into the Middle Ages.

Sources