Difference between revisions of "Hestia"

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In [[Ancient Greece|Greek]] [[mythology]], Hestia was the [[Greek god|goddess]] of the hearth, the first-born of [[Cronos]] and [[Rheia]] and therefore a [[sister]] of [[Zeus]].  She was not involved in the attempt to dethrone Zeus.  Like [[Artemis]] and [[Athene]], she remained a virgin.  Peaceable and undemanding, she relinquished her place as one of the twelve Olympians when [[Dionysos]] was accepted into that number, but continued to be worshipped in daily religion.
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In [[Ancient Greece|Greek]] [[mythology]], '''Hestia''' was the [[Greek god|goddess]] of the hearth, the first-born of [[Cronos]] and [[Rheia]] and therefore a [[sister]] of [[Zeus]].  She was not involved in the attempt to dethrone Zeus.  Like [[Artemis]] and [[Athene]], she remained a virgin.  Peaceable and undemanding, she relinquished her place as one of the twelve Olympians when [[Dionysos]] was accepted into that number, but continued to be worshipped in daily religion.


Her Roman equivalent is [[Vesta]].
Her Roman equivalent is [[Vesta]].

Latest revision as of 15:44, 8 September 2020

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In Greek mythology, Hestia was the goddess of the hearth, the first-born of Cronos and Rheia and therefore a sister of Zeus. She was not involved in the attempt to dethrone Zeus. Like Artemis and Athene, she remained a virgin. Peaceable and undemanding, she relinquished her place as one of the twelve Olympians when Dionysos was accepted into that number, but continued to be worshipped in daily religion.

Her Roman equivalent is Vesta.